Pattern review · Uncategorized

Tamarack Tights

A long time ago I had this idea for a pair of work-out style tights for Sofiona. But it took Trish suggesting that we work on a small activewear collection for the new year that forced me to actually focus attention on them properly. Of course, a year later a few other ideas have altered my original draft, but I hope you like what I came up with. Continue reading to see what we found during testing about fabric, the rise, the waistband and possible topstitching ideas for active wear (with and without cover stitch machines).

The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with ankle piecing. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Chloe @t_wootsie

I do want to say that I consider all our patterns a collaboration of sorts with our testers, but I think Tamarack might be the most affected by excellent feedback so far. I feel like what you have is a great collection of ideas and thoughts. This pattern was truly elevated by a great team.

First, the pattern details:

  • 2 lengths – the long cropped (also known as 7/8 length) and the shorts
  • 2 waistband heights
  • 2 upper leg options – a full upper leg and a pieced upper leg with a curve going over the hip
  • 2 ankle piecing options – one full , curved ankle section and a 2-piece curved option that is great for mesh or stretch lace detailing
  • optional gusset

I’ll point out that throughout this post you’ll see the Cattail tank top paired with many of these Tamaracks. The Cattail is another new release and is available in the tank options you see here as well as a dress. Worth going to check out!

The Tamarack activewear tights and Cattail Tank top PDF patterns by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Trisha @5littledoodles

Fabrics: My original thought for Tamarack was to focus on athletic knits. We were thinking about dance class and gymnastics. What I totally missed was how particular kids can be about their clothes and for the most part, they do not like compression and what we adults love for holding us in nice and snug, they just consider “too tight”! So when choosing fabrics for this pattern you’ll want to keep that in mind. If you have an athletic knit that is particularly compressive it is recommended to size up in the width of your pattern if you think the wearer might not like it.

The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with ankle piecing. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Sherri @mamidesofiona

Overall you want to choose fabric with good recovery so they maintain their shape and you want 50-70% stretch so that they go on. This pattern has a good amount of negative ease so anything less than 50% stretch might not come up comfortably over those hips/fuller bottoms. As is typical with knits, there are so many different kinds! 4 knits of seemingly similar weights and content will have a completely different feel when it’s in your hands. For those that are not as used to sewing with knits, just relax and know that learning the qualities of knit fabric is not learned in one day. Each sewing project with knit fabric will likely teach you a little more about how it behaves and what kinds you like/don’t like.

The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with ankle piecing. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Kara @stitchindancemom

Elastic waistband: As the testers tried out the pattern on a variety of fabrics, it became very evident that the elastic in the waistband can be left out in certain cases. When you choose a fabric with great recovery, that may just be all you need. And with shorts you have even less fabric to pull or weigh them down which also makes the elastic more of an option and less of a need. Use your own judgement based on the fabric you are using for the waistband.

The Tamarack activewear shorts with curved design line. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Sherri @mamidesofiona

Rise: The full height waistband is drafted to come up to the belly button. Some testers found this perfect while others had kids that preferred a lower waistline. The vertical stretch of fabric also plays very much into just how much the tights will pull up. I purposefully left the rise on the pants higher for best coverage, but if you prefer something lower you can use the shorter waistband and/or adjust the pattern piece itself to remove some height from the rise, bringing the waistband down lower. This will be a hack that you can play with and I strongly suggest not using your most expensive fabric if making adjustments that you haven’t done before. Or, live on the edge! LOL I’ve done it.

The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with ankle piecing. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Amanda @derivingmommyhood

Topstitching: There is no real need to topstitch the Tamaracks, but sometimes it’s fun making them look like something you bought at some fancy store. I’ve compiled a few pictures from our testers on the ways that they chose to topstitch. They used sergers, cover stitch machines and regular sewing machines with decorative stitch options. I’m hoping that by adding these pictures some of you might be inspired to test out some new ideas and have some fun. Remember, always test your topstitching on a scrap fabric that is the same as your final garment!! Not all machines behave the same and sometimes it will take some trial and error to get it right. You do NOT want to be picking those stitches out of your final make if you can at all help it!!

Here’s an example of decorative stitching with a sewing machine….

Decorative stitches for topstitching the Tamarack tights by Sofiona Designs using regular sewing machine.
Photo: Sarai @sarai_hobbies

… and here’s a look at a twin needle finish also on a regular sewing machine. Check your sewing machine manual to see if your machine is compatible with these needles.

Twin needles for topstitching the Tamarack tights by Sofiona Designs using regular sewing machine.
Photo: Lauren

Amanda gave us some pictures to show a few different options on a regular sewing machine. The most basic would be a zig zag or 3-part zig zag stitch that is available on most (all?) regular sewing machines. The others are decorative stitches without a straight stitch running throughout which would restrict movement. When choosing a decorative stitch you want to make sure that you can still stretch the fabric. Very important.

Decorative stitches for topstitching activewear using regular sewing machine.
Photo: Amanda @derivingmommyhood

Here’s an example of Erica’s stitches that she used for her daughter’s Tamaracks. She included a pic of some of her sewing machine stitch options. You can see that there are a few different options that will give you a decorative look while still maintaining the ability to stretch. Not all of those will work, but a number of them will.

Decorative stitches for topstitching activewear using regular sewing machine.

Some people use a serger and a regular sewing machine. By placing the pattern pieces WRONG sides together instead of the typical right sides together, that serged edge remains on the outside of the garment. It’s then pressed down and topstitched (with a stretch stitch still!!) in place. Sometimes this take a bit of training your brain to think opposite since the inside of your garment is going to have the finish that is typically on the outside. You probably don’t want to rush this method unless you’re all good with maybe needing to rip seams. 😬

Mock coverstitch method using a serger and a regular sewing machine.

Here’s Danielle’s example of the serger seam on the outside which she topstitched with a zig zig.

The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with ankle piecing. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Danielle

As a cover stitch owner myself, I’m intrigued with, but not at all an expert at, the reverse coverstitch technique commonly used on activewear. I was introduced to the Coverstitch Sewing Discussion Group on FB some time ago and it is such a great resource for anyone who owns a coverstitch machine. So much good info on how to achieve that look of store bought work out tights. I still need to find a clear foot for my machine to see what I’m doing, but it’s not stopping me from practicing. A number of our testers pulled out their coverstitch machines for this pattern and, as you can see, it can be subtle or vibrant.

The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with full ankle piece. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Randi @emerylaineapparel
The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with full ankle piece. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Sherri @mamidesofiona

We recently introduced A0 files to our patterns and, yes, we do want to update our earlier patterns to include A0, but with this release we’ve also added a projector file specifically to be used with your sewing projector set up. If you’re interested in learning more about use of projectors, proper calibration of projectors, or anything else projector related we highly recommend you check out the Facebook group “Projectors for Sewing“.

I leave you with that! I hope this has helped you make a few decisions about your own Tamarack make. Now enjoy a few more tester pics. We had some very active young ladies for these photo shoots which gave us all a good laugh once in awhile. I loved it all. 🙂 And as per usual, we love to see your makes. Share them with us on IG and/or in our Facebook Sofiona Designs Fan Group using the hashtags #sofitamarack #sofionadesigns #tamarackinthewild.

The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with full ankle piece. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs.
Photo: Sarai @sarai_hobbies
The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with ankle piecing. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Lois @windsorwoollies
The Tamarack activewear tights in long crop length with ankle piecing. PDF pattern by Sofiona Designs for girls size 2-16.
Photo: Lauren

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